Category Archives: Reviews – Legendary

The Hole Truth

Annihilator #1
Writer: Grant Morrison
Artist/Cover artist: Frazer Irving
Letters: Jared K. Fletcher
Editor: Bob Schreck
Publisher: Legendary Comics
Price: $3.99 US

In recent weeks, writer Grant Morrison returned to the forefront of mainstream super-hero comics with the launch of his long-awaited The Multiversity event title from DC Comics. It boasts a bunch of elements that I loved: a diverse array of colorful characters, an affection for and tribute to past super-hero comics for which I hold a great deal of nostalgia, and the challenging qualities of a weird, wild Morrison plot. The Multiversity #1 was a good comic book, but Annihilator #1… it’s a great one. The premise revolves around a somewhat familiar trope, but the sheer madness Morrison brings to the two main characters is mesmerizing as it tickles the funny bone and morbid cartilage. The surreal style of Frazer Irving, Morrison’s artistic collaborator on Seven Soldiers: Klarion the Witch Boy a few years ago, is an ideal choice to bring this mind-trip of the story to life. Given that this title is being released by a lesser-known comics publisher, Annihilator #1 is likely going to fly under the radar of a number of comics readers, and maybe even missed by Morrison fans.

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A Frank Discussion

Holy Terror original graphic novel
Writer/Artist/Cover artist: Frank Miller
Editor: Bob Schreck
Publisher: Legendary Comics
Price: $29.99 US

Frank Miller is one of those rare talents from the world of comics whose name has managed to pierce the invisible wall of awareness between those with an interest in the medium and the larger pop-culture consciousness of mainstream society. And it’s not just due to the faithful film adaptations of projects such as Sin City and 300. The Dark Knight Returns was a work of such importance in the 1980s and has had such a vibrant, healthy life in print in the years since its original publication that people who don’t read comics have actually read it. I’d guess more people know who Frank Miller is than, say, Jack Kirby or Will Eisner (don’t ask me for supporting evidence — it’s pure supposition on my part). Given his profile and his past penchant for crafting benchmark works in the medium, whenever Miller delivers a new project, people in the industry pay attention. Holy Terror‘s origins as a Batman-versus-al Qaeda story shines through here, but freeing the story from the corporately owned intellectual property has allowed Miller to explore more than the notion of terrorism in the 21st century. He’s also able to sound off on super-hero genre archetypes, and honestly, that’s the more interesting aspect of this book.

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