Daily Archives: December 4, 2006

Quick Critiques – Dec. 4, 2006

52 Week 30 (DC Comics)
by Geoff Johns, Grant Morrison, Greg Rucka, Mark Waid, Keith Giffen, Joe Bennett & Ruy Jose/Mark Waid & Duncan Rouleau

This weekly series has proven itself to be a major success for DC Comics, and this particular issue, given its cover and content, should have been something of a milestone for the title. Sure, there have been Clark Kent appearances earlier in the series, this is the first time one of DC’s big three characters has been the focus of the plot. Unfortunately, the writers don’t provide enough detail and context for the Batman/Bruce Wayne story to allow the readership to enjoy it. For example, there’s no indication where on the globe the plot begins, and there’s little indication as to what has finally broken the Bat, what has caused this personal crisis. What I did appreciate in the plot is Renee Montoya’s gradual transformation into the Question’s replacement. I love that we’ve really seen the character grow over the course of the past 30 weeks. The art by Joe Bennett is fairly standard fare, but some lack of clarity in the visuals also contributes to the confusion in the Batman plotline. The two-page Metal Men origin story that serves as a backup feature is, not surprisingly, a lot of fun. Given Dr. Will Magnus’s prominent role in this series, it’s too bad the creators didn’t get around to it sooner. Duncan Rouleau’s art for the feature is some of the best work I’ve seen from him. His exaggerated style suits the morphing characters, and Rouleau offers up some tight, crisp linework here. 5/10

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We Are a Hedge

Mail Order Ninja Vol. 1 & 2
Writer: Joshua Elder
Artist: Erich Owen
Letters: Lucas Rivera
Editor: Paul Morrissey
Publisher: Tokyopop
Price: $5.99 US/$7.99 CAN (per book)

After reading the first two volumes of this new American-produced title, I was struck by one overriding thought: it’s rather juvenile. I mean that in both the positive and negative connotations of the term. There’s a youthful energy to the characters, and on the surface, there’s an innocence at play that’s appealing (but quickly dispelled). But writer Joshua Elder’s script is inconsistent, switching between a zany comedy mode to straightforward action. Furthermore, the premise and story fail to follow any kind of internal sense of logic. Manga fans will be pleased, however, with artist Erich Owen’s Japanese-inspired artwork. It’s sharp and clean. He handles the choreography of action scenes quite well, and I rather enjoyed his eye for character design.

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