Daily Archives: July 4, 2007

You Can Handle the Truth

True Story Swear to God Vol. 1 trade paperback
True Story Swear to God #7

Writer/Artist/Cover artist: Tom Beland
Publisher: Image Comics
Price: $3.50 US/$3.75 CAN (comic) – $14.99 US (TPB)

When one writes comics reviews on a regular basis (which I’ve been doing since late 1995… oy), one tries to be mindful of the fact that the works being discussed are crafted real, flesh-and-blood human beings. Occasionally, I wonder how my comments — positive or negative — impact the creators who often hold their work near and dear to their hearts. I get e-mails from creators from time to time, and almost universally, they’re thankful and positive in tone, even in reaction to negative reviews. But I have to admit, this is the first time I’ve seen a reaction to my reviews actually in the context of a comic-book script.

With his latest issue of True Story Swear to God, creator Tom Beland has caught up to the publication of the comic-book title itself, and the story features a brief sequence in which Beland seeks out reviews of his work. The Fourth Rail, my previous review site with partner Randy Lander, is mentioned, as is Johanna Draper-Carlson, one of the most thoughtful and intelligent comics critics one can find online. Sure, it was a kick to see one’s name in a comic in such an unusual way, but what’s most striking about the scene is how honest Beland is about his reviews. Despite their glowing nature, he’s surprised and even a little bit puzzled by them. Honesty has always been the greatest strength of this autobiographical series, and the aforementioned example is just one of many to be found in the new issue and new collected edition.

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Our Worlds at War

War, what is it good for? Well, selling comic books, apparently.

War is the new black for super-hero comics these days. Marvel earned its strongest sales this century with Civil War in 2006-2007, and the publisher has developed a new brand for its lesser-known cosmic characters with its Annihilation titles, featuring space-faring heroes embroiled in armed conflicts as well. Marvel’s also grabbed fan attention with the recent launch of its latest event-driven crossover, World War Hulk, and it has just wrapped up the story of the Inhumans’ retaliation against mankind in Silent War. Marvel’s chief competitor, DC Comics, has embraced war as a dominant motif in its super-hero line as well. It’s easy to see in such titles as World War III, Amazons Attack and last week’s Green Lantern Sinestro Corps Special #1. It’s hardly a brand-new phenomenon either. Alien civilizations rallied behind bitter planetary enemies Rann and Thanagar in 2005, the Fantastic Four usurped control of a Balkan nation in 2003 and the Authority overthrew the U.S. government with its 2004-2005 Revolution. War and invasion have proven to be vital themes in super-hero comics today. And it’s no wonder — the industry and the genre are just proving to be true to their roots. After all, one could argue that without war, the genre just wouldn’t have taken hold in pop culture when it first took off seven decades ago. But are the super-hero comics of today holding true to form, repeating a familiar pattern? Or is the incorporation of war in the genre today something different than we’ve seen before?

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