Daily Archives: November 30, 2017

Clock Works

Doomsday Clock #1
“That Annihilated Place”
Writer: Geoff Johns
Artist: Gary Frank
Colors: Brad Anderson
Letters: Rob Leigh
Cover artists: Gary Frank (regular)/Gary Frank & Dave Gibbons (variants)
Editor: Brian Cunningham
Publisher: DC Comics
Price: $4.99 US/$5.99 US (lenticular)

World-building. That’s what shared super-hero continuities are about. The juxtaposition of diverse characters and the connections that link them have become a huge part of the genre’s appeal over the years, and more recently, TV and movie audiences have discovered that appeal. Watchmen featured a huge world with such connections among an unusual array of characters, but it was crafted as a limited story. A few years ago, DC tried building on that limited world with its Before Watchmen line of limited series. Doomsday Clock is different, as it aims not only to build on the world constructed by Alan Moore going forward rather than add to the backstory, but it also seeks to connect that world to DC’s other super-hero properties. It’s a controversial project, as many felt this world was complete as it was when Moore finished with it three decades ago. The controversy, I’m sure, won’t stop this book from performing well for DC (though I question the publisher’s decision to launch this event book when another, Metal, is still unfolding). It remains to be seen if Doomsday Clock will prove to be a successful creative enterprise; thus far, I have to admit I’m intrigued.

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Mike Drop

Motor Girl #10
Writer/Artist/Letters/Cover artist: Terry Moore
Publisher: Abstract Studios
Price: $3.99 US

Any week that brings a new Terry Moore comic book into my life is a good one. I’d usually say Moore never disappoints with anything he offers up to his readers, but when I scanned of the cover of this issue of Motor Girl, I encountered disappointment. A small blurb, right under the issue number, cast a pall over me: “Final Issue!” Final issue? Final issue?!? Damn. Fortunately, that’s the only let-down about this concluding chapter of a weird but ultimately grounded and even important work. On the surface, Motor Girl seems like one of the goofier titles Moore has crafted, all on his own, but as we’ve seen in previous issues and as is proven with this conclusion, Motor Girl really isn’t about an imaginary ape pal, cute alien invasions or the cartoonish villainy of a megalomaniacal millionaire. Instead, it’s about the scars inflicted all too often on people who serve, and fortunately, also about the resilience of the human mind and spirit.

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