Monthly Archives: July 2019

Scoop

Lois Lane #1
“Enemy of the People, Part One”
Writer: Greg Rucka
Artist: Mike Perkins
Colors: Paul Mounts
Letters: Simon Bowland
Cover artists: Perkins (regular)/Jenny Frison (variant)
Editor: Mike Cotton
Publisher: DC Comics
Price: $3.99 US

Of this week’s new releases, the first I read was The Walking Dead #193, given the buzz about it being the final issue of the series. It impressed, and I figured it would be the best new book I’d read this week. And then I turned my attention to the DC titles in my pile. I was even more impressed with Superman: Up In the Sky #1 and pleased I finally got a chance to read one of the Wal-Mart exclusives that have only been available in the United States up to this point. 

And then I read Lois Lane #1.

It’s powerful, resonant and relevant. It’s incredibly grounded in our reality, but at the same time, it’s a delightful fantasy for those with a passion for journalism. It’s one of the better takes on the profession I’ve seen in comics, and the only thing about it that disappointed me was the realization that it’ll only run for 12 issues. Greg Rucka not only delves into the importance of the news media here, but also offers a touching and novel examination of Lois and Clark’s relationship.

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Grimes and Punishment

The Walking Dead #193
“The Farm House”
Writer: Robert Kirkman
Artist/Cover artist: Charlie Adlard
Gray tones: Cliff Rathburn
Letters: Rus Wooton
Editor: Sean Mackiewicz
Publisher: Image Comics/Skybound Entertainment
Price: $3.99 US

That Robert Kirkman opted to end this landmark series now is surprising. It’s such a cash cow, for Kirkman and the other creators on the book personally, and for Image Comics corporately, one would expected things to continue for as long as it was commercially viable. That Kirkman ended it ahead of that point indicates that storytelling is what truly drove that decision. It’s also surprising it’s ended so close to the 200-issue milestone, but undoubtedly, it would have been less of a surprise at #200 than #193. And I think Kirkman really did want to take his audience off guard. After all, that’s been one of the keys to the book’s success over the years.

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