Category Archives: Editorials

Missed Opportunity – Selling Sale

This week marked the release of a new ongoing Superman title, one that merits the attention of fans of the medium, not just fans of the super-hero genre. Penned by Darwyn (DC: The New Frontier) Cooke and illustrated by Tim Sale, Superman Confidential is the result of a collaboration between two of the most respected talents in the industry today. That, combined with the fact that the book features the most recognized icon of comic books in history, should add up to a sales success for DC Comics.

Of course, by “sales success,” I mean the book should fare well in comparison to other comics. No doubt, it’ll land in the top 20 on the Diamond Comic Distributors sales list for November (which we won’t see until December). I’m betting it’ll sell in the neighborhood of 70,000 to 80,000 copies — respectable in the 21st century comics market. But I think the numbers could have been oh-so-much better had DC not missed out on a real marketing opportunity that could have reached a mainstream pop-culture audience.

The key to greater success and a wider audience for Superman Confidential is Tim Sale, but it’s not his reputation in the industry that could have boosted sales. Sure, his work on Batman: The Long Halloween, Dark Victory and Marvel’s various “color” books (Daredevil: Yellow, Spider-Man: Blue and Hulk: Gray) stands out as edgy and unique, but at the moment, his artwork is the industry’s ambassador to the masses who don’t read comics.

Continue reading… →

Challenge of the Super-Friends

DC’s year-long super-hero epic, 52, is a significant exercise in myth-building on the publisher’s part. The weekly schedule and the effort to incorporate continuity elements from DC’s entire super-hero line must be daunting for the series’s four writers, several editors and many artists. It’s a massive undertaking, but one that’s clearly paying off for the publisher, as is evident in the monthly sales charts from Diamond Comic Distributors.

One of the reasons the book is proving to be such fun is that writers Geoff Johns, Grant Morrison, Greg Rucka and Mark Waid have included such a diverse (even odd) array of characters from throughout DC’s publishing history. The most recent issue features not only such well-known characters as Green Arrow, Martian Manhunter and Firestorm, but Ambush Bug and the Bulleteer.

After reading 52 Week Twenty-Four, it struck me that this title reminded me a lot of a guilty-pleasure comic book from my youth: DC Challenge. The brainchild of writer Mark Evanier, the notion was to tell an unpredictable, epic super-hero story, with each issue being penned and illustrated by different creators. Now, while, 52 reportedly has clear plans and plots to guide it from beginning to end, the challenge of DC Challenge was that each writer would have no idea what the previous issue’s scribe had planned. Each issue also ended with a cliffhanger intended by the writer to be seemingly impossible to resolve for the man at the helm of the next issue.

Continue reading… →

Follow the Loss Leader

TV could learn a thing or two from the business of comics.

A few years ago, I was immersed in television. There were innumerable sitcoms I followed, both in prime time and in syndication, and there were plenty of game shows and hour-long dramas on my list of favorites as well. But a couple of years ago, I found I was whittling down my TV viewing, with only four or five programs on my must-see-every-week list.

In recent years, it seems as though TV producers have realized that new ideas — and more importantly, smarter writing — can make for hit shows, and never has that attitude been more apparent with the slew of new shows that debuted this fall. But some of those shows are already in danger of cancellation, and NBC has announced that the intriguing Kidnapped is already kaput, and it had just barely begun telling its story. CBS has announced it’s turfing Smith as well.

Continue reading… →

Life Irritates Art

I don’t really need to review True Story, Swear to God v.2 #1. I’ve made my feelings about Tom Beland’s autobiographical, slice-of-life romance comic known time and time again.  I adore True Story, and I relate to much of what Beland explores in the book.  I’m thrilled that his self-published comic series is about to reach a wider audience with the release of a relaunch through Image Comics.  It’s bound to boost True Story‘s profile significantly, hopefully appealing to the cartooning fans of such other Image titles as Liberty Meadows and PvP.

So no, this is not a review of the new debut issue.  Instead, I want to explore a question that’s rather unique to this comic series: is True Story the same series that it was when it began?  And the truth is that no, it’s not the same book, but it has nothing to do with how Beland writes it now, how he illustrates it or how he markets it.

The change comes in the perspective of some of his readers, namely, those who are aware of the shift in Beland’s life today, as opposed to the past experiences that unfold in the comic.  Beland announced this year that he and wife Lily Garcia had split, albeit on amicable terms.  Developments in the creators’ personal lives are never a concern when it comes to one’s enjoyment of their comic-book storytelling, but in this case, it does have an effect.  You see, True Story is, among other things, a romance comic, and now, the readership knows the ending it was expecting for the autobio title will not come to pass.

Continue reading… →

The Wonder Jeers

In my capacity as a comics critic, news releases from publishers, big and small, and creators make their way into my Inbox.  Since I don’t have a news section, I rarely pay them much heed, but one I received last month caught my eye…

“FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: DC COMICS TO PUBLISH ALL STAR WONDER WOMAN BY NEWLY-EXCLUSIVE SUPERSTAR CREATOR ADAM HUGHES”

Hughes’s involvement in an All-Star Wonder Woman project had been rumored for some time, so it was quite the anti-climactic announcement, especially given that the comic book isn’t slated for release until summer 2007.  But this news release was interesting in that its chosen focus is surprising, given the overall context of the project.

Continue reading… →